Stateside with Cynthia Canty

Michigan Radio • Dec. 8, 2014

When Whole Foods opened in Detroit, there were questions on whether or not the vast majority of Detroit could afford the upscale grocer. Goals were set into place to make the grocer more accessible to the citizens of Detroit. The results, however, have been a mixed bag.

Here, I discuss piece for Slate and FERN, “Can Whole Foods Change the Way Poor People Eat?” with Michigan Radio’s Cynthia Canty.

The New Face of Hunger (coverage)

“Talk of Iowa,” Iowa Public Radio • July 31, 2014

The irony is poignant that hunger exists in a state with the nation’s richest soil and the nation’s number-one ranking in corn and soybean production.   But despite the bounty around them, many Iowans experience what is now called “food insecurity.”   In simpler terms, they can’t find the means to feed themselves or their family, despite many having full-time jobs.  Continue reading “The New Face of Hunger (coverage)”

Hunger in the suburbs

“Radio Times,” WHYY – Philadelphia • July 16, 2014

Perhaps the most devastating aspect of living in poverty is being “food insecure,” a term devised by the government to describe those who are not always certain that they will have access to food.  15 percent of Americans are food insecure, and in Pennsylvania, that number is 12.5 percent, according to statistics from the Pennsylvania Hunger Action Center.  And the face of hunger is changing, with seemingly comfortable, suburban families needing to visit donation-based food pantry’s in order to make ends meet.  Today, we look at hunger in the suburbs with TRACIE McMILLAN, Continue reading “Hunger in the suburbs”

Toensing, McMillan: Hunger no longer affects ‘marginal’ populations

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Photo by Rachel LeGoubin, Chautaqua Daily staff photographer

The Chautauquan Daily  • July 2, 2014

In 1968, CBS Reports showed a documentary called “Hunger in America.” The film illustrated the face of late ’60s poverty: uneducated, unemployed men and women raising skinny-legged kids in run-down shacks. Senior citizens and children were the worst affected. One in 20 Americans at the time struggled with hunger, a figure just above the unemployment rate.

That picture has changed. Continue reading “Toensing, McMillan: Hunger no longer affects ‘marginal’ populations”