Episode 114: Kitchen Sync with Tracie McMillan

edible Radio • Jan. 25, 2012

What if you can’t afford $9 tomatoes?

That was the question award-winning journalist Tracie McMillan couldn’t escape as she watched the debate about America’s meals unfold, one that urges us to pay food’s true cost—which is to say, pay more. So in 2009 McMillan embarked on a groundbreaking undercover journey to see what it takes to eat well in America. For nearly a year, she worked, ate, and lived alongside the working poor to examine how Americans eat when price matters. Continue reading “Episode 114: Kitchen Sync with Tracie McMillan”

Where to buy good food

The Detroit News • Dec. 30, 2011

Author Tracie McMillan walks through Honey Bee/La Colmena Market on Friday, Dec. 30, 2011, selecting garlic on Detroit’s southwest side. Metro Detroit and Michigan are prominently featured in her forthcoming book, “The American Way of Eating,” which examines growing challenges many Americans face to eat healthy. Continue reading “Where to buy good food”

PW Review: The American Way of Eating: Undercover at Walmart, Applebee’s, Farm Fields, and the Dinner Table

Publishers Weekly • Nov. 28, 2011

Hailing from a middle-class rural Michigan background in which Tuna Helper and iceberg-lettuce salads were the usual dinner fare and later schooled at NYU, journalist McMillan (City Limits magazine) resolved to learn firsthand how the food America eats (mostly packaged and processed) is grown, distributed, and bought. Why does good, fresh food have to cost more and be harder to find than fast food? Continue reading “PW Review: The American Way of Eating: Undercover at Walmart, Applebee’s, Farm Fields, and the Dinner Table”

Kirkus Review

Kirkus • Nov. 15, 2011

During the course of a year, former City Limits managing editor McMillan examined the process by which food goes from the field to the table.Whether picking bunches of table grapes, sorting peaches or cutting garlic, the author discovered firsthand the rigors of farm labor working alongside Mexicans and other migrant workers struggling to survive on paltry wages. Continue reading “Kirkus Review”