Women in Food: Journalist Tracie McMillan Explores Crossroads Of Food And Poverty

Seedstock • August 5, 2014

Over the past few years, journalist Tracie McMillan has carved out a space to talk about food in a way that isn’t discussed all that much in the mainstream media, namely, how it relates to the lives of working-class and poor people. …more…

The New Face of Hunger in America (coverage)

“Happening Now with Jon Scott and Jenna Lee,” Fox News • August 4, 2014

National Geographic Magazine uncovers surprising new information about poverty

 

 

The New Face of Hunger (coverage)

“Talk of Iowa,” Iowa Public Radio • July 31, 2014

The irony is poignant that hunger exists in a state with the nation’s richest soil and the nation’s number-one ranking in corn and soybean production.   But despite the bounty around them, many Iowans experience what is now called “food insecurity.”   In simpler terms, they can’t find the means to feed themselves or their family, despite many having full-time jobs.  …more…

Hunger in the World’s Wealthiest Nation

“Leonard Lopate Show,” WNYC • July 28, 2014

Tracie McMillan looks at the face of hunger in this country and why millions of working Americans are struggling to feed their families. 

…more…

Hunger in the suburbs

“Radio Times,” WHYY – Philadelphia • July 16, 2014

Perhaps the most devastating aspect of living in poverty is being “food insecure,” a term devised by the government to describe those who are not always certain that they will have access to food.  15 percent of Americans are food insecure, and in Pennsylvania, that number is 12.5 percent, according to statistics from the Pennsylvania Hunger Action Center.  And the face of hunger is changing, with seemingly comfortable, suburban families needing to visit donation-based food pantry’s in order to make ends meet.  Today, we look at hunger in the suburbs with TRACIE McMILLAN, …more…

Toensing, McMillan: Hunger no longer affects ‘marginal’ populations

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Photo by Rachel LeGoubin, Chautaqua Daily staff photographer

The Chautauquan Daily  • July 2, 2014

In 1968, CBS Reports showed a documentary called “Hunger in America.” The film illustrated the face of late ’60s poverty: uneducated, unemployed men and women raising skinny-legged kids in run-down shacks. Senior citizens and children were the worst affected. One in 20 Americans at the time struggled with hunger, a figure just above the unemployment rate.

That picture has changed. …more…

Morning lecture to address American food insecurity, hunger

The Chautauquan Daily • July 1, 2014

Hunger in the United States looks different than anywhere else in the world, according to National Geographicphotographer Amy Toensing.

“Most of the time, you wouldn’t even know your neighbors were struggling,” she said. “How could you? Some of these people are overweight, and most are employed. They just can’t make ends meet.” …more…

Wal-Mart and Organic Food

“The Craig Fahle Show” WDET • April 18, 2014

Author of New York Times’ bestseller, “The American Way of Eating,” Senior Fellow at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism and Oakland County native Tracie McMillan joins Laura and Travis to discuss an article she recently wrote for The Guardian that debunks stereotypes about who wants and who’s buying organic food. She breaks down the article and talks about Wal-Mart’s role in bringing organic food to the masses. …more…

Beyond Foodies: Why Talking About Food Could Change the World

Georgetown University Library • Apr. 3, 2014

I delivered the Ellen Catherine Gstalder Memorial Lecture at Georgetown University, at the invitation of Georgetown Library Associates and The Hoya. Entitled “Beyond Foodies,” the talk covered the link between social justice work and concrete concerns like food, and explored those themes with regard to my work.

Food Inequality Uncovered

The Hoya • March 28, 2014

When journalist Tracie McMillan set out to write about poverty through the lens of hunger, she had no idea that her ideas would spark a national debate on the relationship between food and class in America.

In her widely acclaimed book, “The American Way of Eating,” McMillan argues that fresh and healthy food should be thought of as a social and public good. …more…