Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: The Human Cost of American Agriculture

Civil Eats • Oct. 7, 2013

In 2004, Seth Holmes, a young American physician and anthropologist, undertook a trip that few take for kicks: He migrated from the rural highlands of Oaxaca in southern Mexico to the deserts of Arizona alongside a band of indigenous migrants bound for American farm fields. Continue reading “Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: The Human Cost of American Agriculture”

Best Food and Agriculture Books of 2012

Civil Eats • Dec. 27, 2012

The Diversified Farming Systems Center at UC Berkeley is a new initiative gathering students and faculty from across campus to study agriculture and food systems. How can the way we grow, process, transport, and distribute our food be made more equitable and more sustainable? Continue reading “Best Food and Agriculture Books of 2012”

All Praise the Civics of Food Hubs

Civil Eats • Sept. 7, 2012

Just a few years ago there were but a smattering of “networks that allow regional growers to collaborate on marketing and distribution,” as Grist writer Claire Thompson observed, “networks that include a broad range of operations, from multi-farm CSAs to Craigslist-like virtual markets where buyers and producers can connect.” Continue reading “All Praise the Civics of Food Hubs”

Going Undercover in the Belly of Our Beastly Food Chain

Civil Eats • March 1, 2012

Tracie McMillan’s The American Way of Eating: Undercover at Walmart, Applebee’s, Farm Fields and the Dinner Table takes us on a vivid and poignant tour of a place we don’t really want to go: the mostly hidden, sometimes horrible world of the workers who form the backbone of our cheap, industrialized food chain. Continue reading “Going Undercover in the Belly of Our Beastly Food Chain”