The Secret World of Garlic

Fern Talks & Eats • Oct 3, 2014

Fern Talks & Eats is a party, a performance, and a moveable feast. The centerpiece of the evening is a series of stories told by FERN writers. Like a progressive meal, each story unfolds from a different stage, paired with a thematically related dish specially prepared by an area chef. The dish with McMillan’s talk was garlic soup and garlic grissini, by Chef Mary Cleaver of Cleaver Co.

Women in Food: Journalist Tracie McMillan Explores Crossroads Of Food And Poverty

Seedstock • August 5, 2014

Over the past few years, journalist Tracie McMillan has carved out a space to talk about food in a way that isn’t discussed all that much in the mainstream media, namely, how it relates to the lives of working-class and poor people. Continue reading “Women in Food: Journalist Tracie McMillan Explores Crossroads Of Food And Poverty”

Beyond Foodies: Why Talking About Food Could Change the World

Georgetown University Library • Apr. 3, 2014

I delivered the Ellen Catherine Gstalder Memorial Lecture at Georgetown University, at the invitation of Georgetown Library Associates and The Hoya. Entitled “Beyond Foodies,” the talk covered the link between social justice work and concrete concerns like food, and explored those themes with regard to my work.

Food Inequality Uncovered

The Hoya • March 28, 2014

When journalist Tracie McMillan set out to write about poverty through the lens of hunger, she had no idea that her ideas would spark a national debate on the relationship between food and class in America.

In her widely acclaimed book, “The American Way of Eating,” McMillan argues that fresh and healthy food should be thought of as a social and public good. Continue reading “Food Inequality Uncovered”

the calm after the storm: autumn 2013

I can often be a whiner. But right now I’m feeling silent on that front, because the fall has been pretty amazing. I have had the incredible luck to be overwhelmingly busy with work, including reporting for two features that I’m actually excited about — big news for any freelancer. (Keep your eyes out for my byline, fingers crossed, in the New York Times Magazine and National Geographic.)

But I’ve also been privileged enough to be traveling to talk about The American Way of Eating and why having a frank conversation about food and class is important in today’s America. Here’s a quick recap below, mostly to give a shout out to the wonderful, generous people who’ve been hosting my writerly self all across the country (and generously helping me cover living expenses in the process)!

Continue reading “the calm after the storm: autumn 2013”

#AWE a top summer reading pick

If you’re looking for some summer reading, #AWE got a couple nice shout-outs recently:

Molly at Word, the best little neighborhood bookstore in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, says “it’s a great investigative tale even if you’re not a sucker for The Omnivore’s Dilemma and Salt Sugar Fat.” Feel free to grab a copy of the book and see if you agree!

And Will Budiaman over at The Daily Meal put #AWE in the first slot for “10 Must Read Books for Home Cooks This Summer.” And called it “gritty undercover investigative reporting at its best and most riveting.”

Announcing the Winners of the 2013 Hillman Prizes in Journalism

The Sidney Hillman Foundation • April 23, 2013

The Sidney Hillman Foundation announced today the winners of the 2013 Hillman Prizes, awarded to journalists whose work highlights important social and economic issues and helps bring about change for the better. Continue reading “Announcing the Winners of the 2013 Hillman Prizes in Journalism”

From the “who asked you anyway” files…..

I’m sure this guy meant well, but: Seriously? You email someone you’ve never met to tell them their work is a waste of time? And what, precisely, qualifies you to issue this verdict? Sheesh, internet.

 Dear Tracie: Your [sic] a teriffic [sic] writer,but I’m afraid you wasted a year of your life toiling in minimum wage jobs which are held mostly by undocumented immigrants and people with poor educations. All of us eating better will not change their lives.

Quick note: Um, if we got most of America eating well, it WOULD change their lives. Duh.

The American Way of Eating

Michael Ruhlman • July 25, 2012

One of the curious things about doing a semi-ridiculous reporting project—say, leaving behind your life to go work undercover as a farm worker, Walmart produce clerk, and Applebee’s kitchen wretch—is that near-strangers confront you with grand, existential queries. Like: What’s the most important thing you learned? Continue reading “The American Way of Eating”